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Charter Schools, Money And Test Scores

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 17:49
The University of Arkansas today released what it calls a "first ever" study exploring the relationship between charter school funding and student achievement.

Inflation Came In Low Again, But Are There Bubbles?

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 17:40
Want to borrow money for a car or a home this fall?

Oddly enough, the interest rates available months from now for big-ticket items may be determined by the prices you pay today for everyday consumer goods.

Glass Or No Glass? That Is The Grill Lid Question

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 17:40
We love cooking on our grills, especially in the summertime. Keeping the house cool and avoiding the dish pile up are two major draws – not to mention the flavor of food cooked over fire.

When we saw a glass-topped grill, shining like Cinderella's slipper in a YouTube video posted by commercial glass maker SCHOTT, we were intrigued. But, we wondered, how the heck do you clean it?

First, let's back up.

Fruit Recall Hits Trader Joe's, Costco, Wal-Mart Stores

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 17:39
Fears of possible listeria contamination have led to a national recall of whole peaches, nectarines and other fruits packed by a California company.

Flight MH17: U.S. Builds Its Case; Plane Wreckage Reportedly Cut Apart

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 17:39
American analysts say they've verified several pieces of evidence that show pro-Russian separatist rebels shot down Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, according to U.S. intelligence officials who briefed reporters Tuesday.

Here's a quick rundown of the officials' updates on what U.S. investigators have found, from notes taken by NPR's Pentagon reporter Tom Bowman:

  • A U.S.

Scientists Say Smaller 2006 Landslide Set The Stage For Oso Disaster

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 16:34

A small landslide in 2006 set the stage for the catastrophe that claimed 43 lives in Oso, Washington this past March, say a panel of scientists in a federally-funded study.

The hills above the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River had slid before, at least 15 times over the centuries, according to the study.

But one slide in particular left Oso vulnerable. In 2006, that smaller slide left a loosely-packed mass of debris perched dangerously above the Steelhead Haven development and its neighbors.

Report Faults Seattle Schools For 'Lack Of Urgency' In Serving Most Vulnerable Students

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 16:30

Seattle Public Schools' efforts to educate students with disabilities of all sorts are "in need of urgent, substantial and significant improvement," according to a scathing report released Tuesday, which faulted district staff in administrative offices all the way down to individual schools.

The report itself was commissioned by the district office's special education team as part of an effort to correct, as the authors call it, "an obvious and chronic lack... of urgency" around special education — and to bring Seattle Public Schools back in the good graces of both state officials and of federal law.

Welcoming Home Sara Gazarek

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 16:06

We were very excited to welcome back singer/songwriter, Sara Gazarek, a graduate from the Roosevelt High School jazz program who has since made a home in the L.A. jazz scene. 

Sara stopped by the KPLU Seattle studios for this interview and performance while in town at Jazz Alley with Band members Josh Nelson (piano), Hamilton Price (bass), Zach Harmon (drums) and Larry Koonse (guitar).

Fire Evacuees Find Help With Donation Centers, Shelters

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 10:57

The Okanogan County Sheriff’s Department ordered more homeowners to evacuate Monday afternoon after firefighters saw a brief relief from high winds and hot weather Sunday.

Donations are coming in by the truckload to the Pateros High School in central Washington. Piles of clothes hip-deep fill the gym. Stacks of food, water and pet food line the hallways.

Wash. To Host First Public Meeting On Inslee's Fish Consumption Rate Proposal

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 05:00

Washington is slowly moving ahead with a long-delayed plan to update its water quality rules. Tuesday's will be the first public meeting on Gov. Jay Inslee’s proposal to dramatically increase the fish consumption rate, which determines how clean discharged water must be. But some say the proposal doesn’t go far enough.

5 Reasons Eating Bugs Could Save The World, According To Seattle's Own 'Bug Chef'

KPLU News - Tue, 07/22/2014 - 05:00

Seattle author David George Gordon would be more than happy to share his recipe for his three bee salad or cricket nymph risotto. Try the deep-fried tarantula, the bloomin’ onion of arachnids.

Gordon is known as “the bug chef,” and has written one of the more comprehensive cookbooks showcasing bugs and their kin. He is also a true believer in insects as a food source for an ever-hungrier planet, as laid out in a lengthy U.N. report last year.

Hospital Settles Lawsuit By Thousands Of Women Over Exam Photos

KPLU News - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 15:05
The Johns Hopkins Health System will pay $190 million to former patients of a gynecologist who used a small camera to secretly film examinations, in one of the the largest sexual misconduct settlements involving a physician.

The Baltimore-based hospital is settling a class-action lawsuit that includes more than 7,000 women and at least 62 minors; more women will likely register with the suit.

From member station WYPR, Christopher Connelly reports:

"Dr. Nikita Levy saw more than 12,000 patients over the decades he spent working at Hopkins.

For These Vegans, Masculinity Means Protecting The Planet

KPLU News - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 14:44
Real men eat meat. They kill it and then they grill it.

That's the stereotype, or cliche, that's about as old as time.

At a recent barbecue in Brooklyn, N.Y., a half-dozen guys who resist that particular cultural stereotype gathered together. Many of them are muscled semi-professional athletes, including triathlete Dominic Thompson, competitive bodybuilder Giacomo Marchese and mixed martial arts fighter Cornell Ward.

They're also all vegans and eschew all animal products.

1 Million Net Neutrality Comments Filed, But Will They Matter?

KPLU News - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 14:44
The Federal Communications Commission received more than 1 million public comments on the issue of net neutrality during a five-month commenting period that ended Friday.

It's the biggest public response the FCC has ever gotten on a policy matter in such a short period, and the second most commented-upon FCC issue, period.

If You're A College Man Who Hasn't Shared His Bed, You're Not Alone

KPLU News - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 14:41
Freelance writer Noah Berlatsky talks about sex in college — or, rather, not having sex in college. Berlatsky was among the 10 percent of students who remain virgins throughout college, and this felt to him like an embarrassment — and a knock against his masculinity. But, he realized in time, it made him no less or more a man. Copyright 2014 NPR.

Flight MH17: Black Boxes And Bodies Handed Over; U.N. Calls For Inquiry

KPLU News - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 14:40
This post was last updated at 7:10 p.m.

This Year, Avignon Festival Is A Stage For Both Plays And Protest

KPLU News - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 14:40
Every July, for one month a year, the southern French city of Avignon becomes a theater. Actors, directors and playwrights converge on the walled, medieval town, where thespians perform in every playhouse, opera house, church and even in the streets. It's all part of the Avignon Theater Festival, which was started in 1947 by renowned French actor and director Jean Vilar.

"The main idea is that culture is not only for rich people but for everybody," says dramatist Olivier Py, director of this year's 68th Avignon Festival. "That was quite a change.

High-Performing Charter Schools May Improve Students' Health

KPLU News - Mon, 07/21/2014 - 14:39
Many people are intensely interested in how publicly funded charter schools affect children, and that includes not just their academic achievement but their health.

Researchers from UCLA and the Rand Corp. wanted to know whether attending a high-performing charter school reduced the rates of risky health behaviors among low-income minority teenagers.

They surveyed 521 ninth through 12th-grade students in Los Angeles who attended charter schools, and 409 students who attended local neighborhood schools.