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Identifying Found Treasures

KPLU News - 2 hours 27 min ago

 

When Candice Pearson was a little girl back in the 1950s she visited her uncle in Bellingham who was a farmer. As he was plowing the field, one of the rocks he cleared away was different. Even at age six, Pearson knew it was special.

 

Is It Time to Stop Tipping Restaurant Servers?

KPLU News - 2 hours 32 min ago

The debate is on.

In this week's Food for Thought Nancy Leson cites a recent Stranger article by Angela Garbes reporting that Renee Erikson has eliminated tipping at her restaurants The Whale Wins, The Walrus and the Carpenter, and Barnacle.  Which story then prompted a debate among Stranger staff about the virtues and drawbacks of tipping.

Germanwings Co-Pilot May Have Rehearsed Crash On Earlier Flight, Report Finds

KPLU News - 3 hours 25 min ago
The Germanwings co-pilot, who crashed a passenger jet into the French Alps, may have practiced the crash during an earlier flight.

According to a preliminary report issued by French investigators, Andreas Lubitz set the altitude dial to 100 ft. several times during an outbound flight from Dusseldorf to Barcelona on March 24.

Lubitz, the report finds, was alone in the cockpit when he made the changes to the dial.

California Regulators Adopt Unprecedented Water Restrictions

KPLU News - 3 hours 52 min ago
Saying state officials and residents simply haven't done enough to curb water use, California regulators unanimously approved unprecedented water restrictions on Tuesday.

The AP reports:

"The State Water Resources Control Board approved rules that force cities to limit watering on public property, encourage homeowners to let their lawns die and impose mandatory water-savings targets for the hundreds of local agencies and cities that supply water to California customers

Chicago Set To Create Reparation Fund For Victims Of Police Torture

KPLU News - 4 hours 28 min ago
The city of Chicago will take a big step today toward closing what Mayor Rahm Emanuel has called one of the darkest chapters in city history, as the city council is expected to approve a $5.5 million dollar reparations fund for victims of police torture.

The fund will compensate victims tortured by notorious former Chicago Police Lt.

What Happens In Vegas Includes Crowded, Struggling Schools

KPLU News - 5 hours 29 min ago
Las Vegas is back, baby.

Six Words: 'My Name Is Jamaal ... I'm White'

KPLU News - 5 hours 29 min ago
NPR continues a series of conversations from The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words.

People make a lot of assumptions based on a name alone.

Jamaal Allan, a high school teacher in Des Moines, Iowa, should know. To the surprise of many who have only seen his name, Allan is white.

Huckabee Hopes Evangelical Voters Are Tying Yellow Ribbons For Him

KPLU News - 5 hours 29 min ago

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKw8mTpp2cg

Teacher Walkouts, By The Numbers: 1 In 4 Washington Kids Now Impacted

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 20:16

Two weeks from now, a teacher walkout will have impacted one out of every four of Washington state's 1 million public school students.

That's after Monday's confirmation teachers in Seattle Public Schools would join colleagues in 28 other districts in approving a "one-day strike" to protest state lawmakers' stances on several key education issues.

Pacquiao Sued For Failing To Disclose Injury Before 'Fight Of The Century'

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 15:57
Boxer Manny Pacquiao is being sued for his failure to disclose a shoulder injury during his "Fight of the Century" Saturday against Floyd Mayweather Jr.

Reuters reports: "The lawsuit was filed by Stephane Vanel and Kami Rahbaran in federal court in Nevada.

Justice Dept. Criticizes Punishments For Agents Linked To Student's Detention

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 15:05
Federal agents who forgot that a detained San Diego college student was in a jail cell without food or water for more than four days were reprimanded and suspended for up to seven days, a punishment the Justice Department says is inadequate.

The case involves Daniel Chong's detention in 2012 by agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration.

"What happened to Mr.

Road-Tripping On The West Coast Electric Highway

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 15:03

The call of the open road beckons to electric car owners now that Washington and Oregon have completed their portions of the West Coast Electric Highway, a network of rapid recharging stations to enable long distance electric-powered travel.

Tea Tuesdays: Butter Up That Tea, Tibetan-Style

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:57
Butter (arguably) makes everything better – even tea. For Chime Dhorje, who works at Café Himalaya in New York City, the butter in the cup of tea before him ideally comes from a yak.

Yak butter tea is often referred to as the national drink of Dhorje's homeland, Tibet. Tibetans drink it all day long — up to 60 cups a day, it's said — though they're not the only ones who enjoy it: It's consumed in countries throughout the Himalayas.

In those lofty Himalayan mountains, a few cups of yak butter tea would be a welcome respite from the cold, thin air.

Clinton 'War Room' Pushback And The 'Invent Your Own' Media Campaign

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:42

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QoLO0RJx5lw

From Oakland To Baltimore, Lessons Learned From Cities Of Unrest

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:11
The images from Baltimore of demonstrations, police in riot gear, looting and outbreaks of violence are familiar to some other cities after encounters with police ended in death for unarmed individuals — primarily black men.

Officials say what comes from those tragic encounters can be important lessons about policing and moving forward.

In April 2001, Cincinnati Police Officer Stephen Roach fatally shot 19-year-old Timothy Thomas in the city's Over-the-Rhine neighborhood, an inner city area, then in deep decline.

In Puerto Rico's Debt Crisis, There Are No Easy Solutions

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 14:11
The island of Puerto Rico is many things: a tropical paradise, a U.S. territory and an economic mess. After years of deficits, state-owned institutions in Puerto Rico owe investors some $73 billion. That's four times the debt that forced Detroit into bankruptcy two years ago. The bill is now due.

One of the most visible signs of the crisis is a tent city on the plaza in front of Puerto Rico's historic Capitol building in San Juan. For several weeks, a group of protesters have been camped out, with signs, rallies and music. They're opposing plans by Gov.

Obama Laces Up To Tout Asian Trade Deal At Nike

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 13:17
President Obama says he wants consumers around the world buying more products stamped, "Made in the U.S.A."

That's one reason he's pushing a controversial Asian trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Obama has chosen a curious setting to make his pitch for the trade agreement this week.

Virtual Volunteers Use Twitter And Facebook To Make Maps Of Nepal

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 13:17
The village of Melamchighyang needs 100 blankets.

The remote area of Hyolmo has many injuries, and only two nonprofit groups are providing "limited aid."

Two girls from Germany are missing in Langlang Valley.

People are stranded in Kyanjin Gompa.

These pleas for help in the aftermath of the Nepal earthquake have popped up on ever changing maps of the disaster zone, compiled and posted by hundreds of digital volunteers around the globe.

It's No Joke: Venezuela Cracks Down On Comedians

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:55

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_9ucoJqmQ0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KndYcoWoSo

New French Rules Would Expand Surveillance Of Terrorism Suspects

KPLU News - Tue, 05/05/2015 - 12:19
French lawmakers in the lower house of parliament have voted overwhelmingly to approve a bill legalizing a broad surveillance of terrorism suspects. The legislation, which must still be approved by the country's Senate, has been criticized as highly intrusive.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley tells our Newscast unit:

"One of the most sensitive measures of the bill would allow intelligence services to collect masses of data on regular citizens, which would be subject to analysis for potentially suspicious behavior.